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MN2302 Hovea / Sewalongs

Making a Scrap Patchwork Hovea Coat From Leftover Fabrics

Megan Nielsen Patterns | Patchwork Hovea From Leftover Fabrics

So if you read my post a couple of weeks back on scrap quilting you’ll know a bit about the steps that goes into the making of a scrap patchwork quilted jacket, but today – just for fun – I thought I’d share a bit more about making our scrap patchwork Hovea Curve quilted coat sample from leftover fabrics!


A patchwork Hovea is such a great way to use up left over fabric from other projects, even the tiniest of bits can be put to use and given a new life. All of the fabrics that went into the Hovea Curve Scrappy Coat were sourced from our studio stash which if you wanted a sneak peak at, you can see in the fabric storage post the team wrote a few months ago. As I was delving through our cupboards, beginning to plan my colour scheme & patch work design, it felt like a trip down memory lane! I kept spotting the scraps of fabric we’d used in other samples and as I pulled out the remnants, I even noticed the shapes of pattern pieces left in their negative space. I felt like I was doing a puzzle, trying to spot which pattern pieces from which pattern had been cut out from each scrap!

Megan Nielsen Patterns | Patchwork Hovea From Leftover Fabrics | The Scoop Of A Tania Culotte Megan Nielsen Patterns | Patchwork Hovea From Leftover Fabrics | The Pocket Of A Pair Of Opal Curve Shorts Megan Nielsen Patterns | Patchwork Hovea From Leftover Fabrics | The Point Of A Floreat DressThe scoop of a Tania pleat, the curve of an Opal pocket or the point of a Floreat hem – each left their distinct silhouette in the fabrics. It was so wonderful to reflect on all the beautiful garments we had made over the years and so satisfying to know that every last scrap that we’d kept & squirrelled away was now getting not only used, but celebrated! The scrappy coat was going to be like a sewing scrapbook – except wearable.

Megan Nielsen Patterns | Patchwork Hovea From Leftover Fabrics | The Front Of An Olive Top Megan Nielsen Patterns | Patchwork Hovea From Leftover Fabrics | The Sleeve Of A Darling Ranges Curve TopMegan Nielsen Patterns | Patchwork Hovea From Leftover Fabrics | The Pieces Of A River TopAs I sorted the scraps, I matched them to their samples and by my count, the rems of at least 17 samples got used in the scrappy coat! SEVENTEEN! It’s so amazing to me that the fabric of so many garments are now connected together in one coat and that the different shapes that their pattern pieces left behind, were the shapes that created the patchwork design we ended up with. It feels so meant to be!

Megan Nielsen Patterns | Patchwork Hovea From Leftover Fabrics | All The Samples That Went Into The Scrappy CoatMegan Nielsen Patterns | Patchwork Hovea From Leftover Fabrics | A Little Time, A Bit Of Effort & A Whole Lotta Love

Megan Nielsen Patterns | Patchwork Hovea From Leftover Fabrics | Process Of The Scrappy Coat

Thanks for coming along on that little reflection of mine! It’s so important to sometimes stop and appreciate the amazing skills we have, the beautiful things we make and how far we’ve come in our making journeys. I hope you’ll be able to look through your own scrap stashes and reminisce on all the amazing things you’ve made yourself – and then maybe make them into your own scrap patchwork Hovea jacket ;)

Naomi xx


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About Author

Naomi is the Design Assistant here at Megan Nielsen Patterns, and our resident helping hand. She stays busy assisting Meg with pattern development leg work, getting super excited about good instructional diagrams and making green coloured fabric suggestions for every sample we make. She’s a problem solver, a fabric addict, a serial tea-forgetter and a passionate maker.

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Beth
7 months ago

When making a scrappy project like this, does the grainline not matter??

Tracey
7 months ago

If you really like the look of patchwork but don’t necessarily want the thickness or warmth of something quilted, is it ok to make up a patchwork fabric for the main and then line it? Or is batting required if you create patchwork fabric? Thanks in advance!

Meg
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Meg
7 months ago
Reply to  Tracey

Tracey you can absolutely do that – i think it’s a great idea! I think this is also a really nice option if you’re wanting the details of the lined versions but want to include patchwork :)

Tracey
7 months ago
Reply to  Meg

Thank you so much for your quick response. I just bought the pattern, and you’re so right – I love those details like the collarband. Excited to get started now!