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Jarrah Sewalong // How to sew the tie hem (view c)

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns

Last but not least – let’s do the tie hem on our Jarrah sweaters! If you are making View C, the time has finally come to finish your top, and this post is just for you! The details of this hem may seem a little intimidating, but it’s really not bad at all. It’s my favourite of all the hem options. We’ll go over how to get around that little curve, as well as some options for finishing the tie points – including mitered corners!

Let’s just get to it….

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen PatternsUsing a long stitch length, baste around the inner curved edge 1/2″ from the edge. Just around the curve, you don’t have to go any farther down.

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns Clip into the curve at 1/2″ intervals. This was about 5 clips for me.

Be careful to clip up to, but not through, the basting stitches.

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns Turn the clipped curve in towards the wrong side along the basting stitches, and press.

You can see how the clips help the curve fan out and create the smooth edge.

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns Continue turning under the rest of the hem by 1/2″ inch, pressing as you go.

When you get to the tie ends, you have two options…

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns You can simply turn in both sides by 1/2″ so that it overlaps at the tip.

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns You’ll have a little excess at the tip beyond where it overlaps. Simply trim it off.

From here you could simply move on to the next step, sticking with the overlapped tip ends. But theres a second option I want to share with you for finishing these tips…

MITERED CORNERS (optional)

This is kind of a modified way of creating a mitered corner. Its not the traditional, technical way of creating a 90 degree mitered corner like I showed you with the split sleeve. Because this isn’t a 90 degree corner. But you can get the same effect with the steps below…

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns Temporarily turn the 1/2″ hem around to the wrong side – towards the right side of the fabric. Let the tip overlap. Press well.

You only have to do this at the tip, not the entire hem.

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns Gently open the overlapping tip with your fingers, and then pinch the two layers of fabric together. Theres no specific measurement or guide to help you with this. You’ll just know as you feel it. Pinch it together until you feel it lie flat against the other layer.

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns Pin along where you’ve pinched the fabric. This creates the angle at which you need to sew.  How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns Sew along the line you have pinned. As you can see – mine ended up being a bit of a curve.

Trim off any excess.

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns Turn the seams back towards the inside. Use a point turner to get the perfect point at the tip. Press again.

As you can see, there’s now a seam down the middle of the tip. This creates a nice clean finish, instead of having overlapping pieces and exposed raw edges.

I would suggest maybe practicing this first on scrap fabric. Its important to understand how to get the right angle. If you don’t get the right angle, it won’t lay flat when you turn it back right way around. 

MOVING ON WITH THE HEM…

How to sew the split sleeves and curved hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen PatternsHow to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns Just like with the curved hem I showed you a few posts ago, you can choose to (or not to) use a fusible hem tape like Stitch Witchery to stabilize and hold your hem in place before topstitching. Just sandwich it in the folds and iron using the directions. Do this along the entire hem, including the inner curve and tie tips.

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen Patterns From the right side, topstitch around the entire hem edge, front and back, using either a zig zag stitch or twin needle. Do this in one continuous stitch, pivoting at the tie tips, and carefully manoeuvring around the curve.

How to sew the tie hem on the Jarrah sweater by Megan Nielsen PatternsThats it! How great does that tie look all knotted up?!

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About Author

Holly writes part time for the Megan Nielsen blog– sewing like crazy, creating tutorials and sewalongs. She has been sewing since she was a little girl, and has her degree in apparel design. Now she’s a stay at home mama, and spends all her free nap times at her sewing machine.

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Mary Hearn
Mary Hearn
3 years ago

I’d just like to say what an excellent set of tutorials this is. I’ve just made the tie hem, split sleeve vice for Christmas for my niece and the results are excellent (sadly can’t post on social media until after Christmas…)

Cass Hausserman
2 years ago

Hi! I love the Jarrah Sweater and have made 5! I love the suggestion about using stitch witchery or washable quilters tape on the hems, but the few times I tried this, my needles got so sticky that they started skipping stitches. I wiped them with some alcohol, but every few inches they would get sticky again. This seems to be a really popular method, so I feel like I must be missing something. Thanks!