Banksia Sewalong: Placket sewing

October 8th, 2012

Okay guys, deep breaths! We are doing the placket today! I know a couple of you have been feeling nervous – don’t be! It’ll be okay :)

Today we’ll be doing the more standard method (which for reference is method 2 in the Banksia instruction booklet). If you think this is possibly a bit too challenging, and you don’t care about exposed seams on the inside of your top etc, then we’ll be covering the slightly easier method tomorrow (method 1 in the instruction booklet). Andddd if you really really feel nervous, on Wednesday we’ll do a faux placket – which is just so ridiculously easy it makes me never want to sew a placket again hehehe.

Anyway, let’s begin!!

The most important thing about plackets is going slowly and preparing. If you haven’t done your basting yet – you here’s the post from last week.

First we’ll iron the interfacing to the wrong side of the fabric (the left picture shows the right side of the placket, and the right shows the interfacing ironed to the wrong side). I like to use very very lightweight fusible. I feel like interfacing is really important as it adds a lot of stability to the placket and the buttonholes.

Now turn the top the wrong way round, and lay your placket pieces face down. The right side of the placket pieces will be facing the wrong side of the fabric. I know it feels wrong, but it’s not :) Make sure that the edges butt up to the centre cut edge of your placket. Make sure the placket extends 5/8″ above the finished edge of neckline (this is important!).

Sew along the basting stitches, and stop about 1 1/4″ (3.2cm) from the bottom edge, where the basting stitches go horizontal.

Fold the edges 5/8″ inwards and iron.

Now fold the placket in half with right sides together. The folded and ironed edge, should be inline with the sewn seam. Sew along the top of placket 5/8″ from the edge. Make sure you do not catch the top or the collar in your stitches.

Now trim the top edge, notch and turn the right way round and press.

Push the bottom edges as well as the triangle of seam allowance at the bottom of the placket opening through to the right side of the top.

The placket will now be enclosing the raw edges of the placket seam. Top stitch the placket closed on the sides, stopping at the horizontal basting.

Now pin the left placket to the horizontal basting, and sew along the basting line. Trim, and press down.

on the right placket, open the placket a bit (actually you might find this easier to do before you sew down the placket sides) and fold under 1/4″ and press, enclosing the raw edges at the bottom.

Align the right placket over the left, and pin in place for stability. Now topstitch around the bottom edges of the placket, and sew a little cross if it takes your fancy :)

Finish up by sewing buttonholes to the right placket, and buttons to the right.

Congrats! You sewed a totally rad placket!!

 

6 Responses

  1. Juli says:

    I’ve never actually sewn a placket before, so this is extremely helpful to see exactly how it’s done in the blouse pattern. All of the step by step photos are so great for reference and it looks like the end result is so fancy and professional. I just recently purchased some super soft denim blue chambray and I can’t wait to get started on my Banksia blouse! Bookmarking this post for reference too. :-)

  2. [...] a tad cumbersome, so i decided to come up with my own way. I think it’s a little easier than the standard version- and i still use it a lot, because i just like it :) I think you will too! (for reference this is [...]

  3. Jenny says:

    Awesome tutorial!! I got round to practicing the placket this weekend and got fantastic results first time, thanks to you!!

  4. [...] Easy fix, I just folded the seam allowance in a little more to take up the difference! I used Method 2 from the instructions for the placket as I wanted that perfect clean look.  (this method [...]

  5. [...] online resources for this one, and her posts on different techniques for making the button placket (here and here) are worth a read, whether you are making this pattern or not.  I *obviously* opted for a [...]